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Movie Review : Fantastic Beasts- The Crimes of Grindelwald

Rated PG-13, for some sequences of fantasy action

After the release of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, I was more than content to say goodbye to the world that J.K. Rowling had created, having enjoyed the grand adventure. Much like when George Lucas’ Star Wars Trilogy ended however, there were many that wanted to still play in the sandbox the author had created.

And so, Rowling revisited the Wizarding World, centering a new film series around the character of Newt Scamander (played by Eddie Redmayne). Newt’s adventures took place during the late 1920’s, and his first film showcased an adventure among witches and wizards in America.

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Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne)

In the Fantastic Beasts sequel, the action returns to Europe, as dark wizard Gellert Grindelwald (Johnny Depp) escapes confinement. At the insistence of Albus Dumbledore (played this time by Jude Law), Newt is asked to help in apprehending Grindelwald.

When it comes to sequels, many people eagerly anticipate seeing their favorite characters again. For this film, you do get Newt’s American friends returning (including Dan Fogler as Jacob Kowalski), but for the most part, the film doesn’t really seem to be about them.

Instead, we’re introduced to a large group of ancillary characters (including a few from the first film), and are given several mysteries to unravel. Unfortunately, the film just doesn’t give us enough time or development to care, as we’re throttled along from one new set-piece after another.

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Albus Dumbledore (Jude Law) 

 

Unlike the first film, this one really seems to be trying hard to throw out little asides to those who are fans of the series. We get a few familiar name-drops, and if you’ve seen the trailers, a (brief) return to Hogwarts Castle.

I couldn’t help but wonder about the film’s writing process, given that this is Rowling’s second screenplay (after the first Beasts film). There are a number of times I couldn’t help but feel the screenplay could have benefited from some rewrites, to narrow the focus and make us care more about what was going on. At times, the film felt as overloaded with material, as Rowling’s fifth Harry Potter novel, The Order of the Phoenix.

Where the film does succeed, is in captivating us with even more magical creatures that Newt encounters. While fan-favorite Niffler is back, the film gives us some intriguing new animals, including a Chinese creature called a Zouwu. Sadly, the new menagerie isn’t enough to save the film.

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Newt encounters a Zouwu.

This is going to sound like a major film-bash, but I can’t help but feel The Crimes of Grindelwald, could be this series’ The Last Jedi. I think a lot of people are going to go into this film with a certain set of expectations, and find they’ve wandered into a different film entirely.

By the looks of where the story is headed now, the Fantastic Beasts title seems almost like an afterthought. With three more films scheduled to follow, one wonders how much longer Newt’s life-long obsession with magical creatures will last on-screen, as he and his friends are pulled into a story that wants to be just as big as the one we saw in Rowling’s Harry Potter series?

Final Grade: C

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Movie Review: Summer of 84

(This film is Not Rated)

Once upon a time, the suburban landscape was seen as the next safe bastion of modern society, beyond the seediness and crime of the city.

Soon, it seemed that the well-manicured lawns and the gable-roofed dwellings, were little more than false-fronts to unspeakable terror.

In the 80’s, there were a number of films that explored what might be hiding behind the locked doors, with films like Fright Night and The Burbs showing normality being invaded by the abnormal.

In Summer of 84, the directing trio behind the cult-favorite film Turbo Kid, move their 80’s-era focus out of the action genre, and into the territory of suspense.

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In Ipswitch, Oregon, 15-year-old Davey Armstrong (Graham Verchere), is spending his summer vacation delivering newspapers, hanging out with his best friends, and lusting after the neighborhood hottie, Nikki (played by Tiera Skovebye). However, the lazy summer mood is soon broken, when word comes that a serial killer is on the loose, and a number of boys in the area begin to turn up missing.

A fan of mysteries and unexplained events, Davey soon believes he has the perfect suspect: his next-door-neighbor, Wayne Mackey (Rich Sommer). This seems strange to his friends, as Mackey is a local Police Officer that has lived in their neighborhood for years, but Davey is determined to solve this summer mystery, with or without them.

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When it comes to retro-laced media, we seem to be living in an era that is currently set on idolizing the world of 30 years ago. In the last few years, we’ve seen shows like Stranger Things and film adaptations like It, plunge their youthful protagonists into a familiar-yet-frightful world.

Unlike those recent pop-culture hits, Summer of 84 has no supernatural elements to be found, or multiple plot layers to pick through. The story strives for something a bit simpler in it’s execution, with much of the time focused on the main kids.

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L to R: Dale Woodworth (Caleb Emery), Davey Armstrong (Graham Verchere), Curtis Farraday (Cory Gruter-Andrew), Tommy Eaton (Judah Lewis)

Along for the ride with Davey, are Dale Woodworth (Caleb Emery), Tommy Eaton (Judah Lewis), and Curtis Farraday (Cory Gruter-Andrew). While the film starts out feeling like it’s just going to be these four talking trash to each other and oogling skin-mags for a majority of time, it surprisingly manages to open up a bit more, and reveal a bit more about who a few of them really are.

I was also surprised to find that there were also a fair amount of jump-scares that actually end up working in the film’s favor (with some of them getting quite creative). The filmmakers definitely use an impressive sleight-of-hand trick to make them work.

While the strange, outlandish wasteland of Turbo Kid seemed open for unquestioning acceptance of that story’s world, there are quite a number of areas in Summer of 84 that had me questioning some of the film’s logic that the directors use.

A good example would be that while we see headlines about a number of young boys disappearing in the Ipswitch area, we never get any indication that the parents or local authorities are that concerned for their kids. Several times we see the four boys and some other non-descript neighbor kids playing a game at night, and yet there’s never a call for a curfew.

There also are some uneven bumps in the road regarding Davey’s crush (and former babysitter), Nikki. Originally seen as an object of desire, the film soon throws her in as an unofficial member of the boy’s investigative group (kind of like how Andy and Steff became unofficial Goonies), but some of the ways the story has her pop up in certain areas seems a bit odd. It almost feels like some added backstory on Nikki could have made her character a bit more acceptable in some scenarios.

Much of the film’s tone almost seems to meander along, until it gets to it’s third act. It is here that it felt like the audience I was with, was suddenly jolted awake by what we were seeing. The suckerpunch end scenes of the film are definitely something that is still seared into my brain, but I did wish that the film could have given us a few more moments during the story, that made us sit-up and take notice a bit more.

Summer of 84 is commendable for not throwing in a supernatural element to it’s nostalgic tale, but there are areas where the storytelling gets a bit too loose for my tastes. A good film, but it feels like with some extra time and care, it could have been a great one.

Final Grade: B-

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Movie Review: The Captain

(This film is Not Rated)

When I was younger, we were often taught that what a person wore, signified who they were. A person in a Police Officer’s uniform was someone you could trust to protect you, or someone in a fancy business suit was a wealthy entrepreneur. Of course, in the last few decades, we’ve seen more and more instances of how appearances (and reputations) can be deceiving.

With his latest film The Captain, writer/director Robert Schwentke has chosen to look into the perceptions of humanity and appearances, all based around actual events that occurred in the waning days of the Second World War.

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As the film begins, we find a German soldier named Willi Herold (Max Hubacher), deserting his post. As he runs across the barren countryside, he soon stumbles upon an abandoned vehicle, which contains a Nazi officer’s uniform inside.

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Max Hubacher as Willi Herold

Willi puts it on, and soon encounters a number of other German soldiers, who upon seeing the uniform of a superior officer, quickly offer their services to him. He soon spins a tale that he has been sent to the front lines under direct orders from Der Fuehrer, and the men are quick to believe his story and follow him.

Their journey eventually leads them to a camp that houses a number of German deserters, and the start of a reign of terror that would lead to Herold being dubbed, “The Executioner of Emsland.”

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To many of us in this country who have seen historical events portrayed on the big-screen, our perceptions of the Germans during World War II have largely been shaped by stories either involving American soldiers (Saving Private Ryan), or those dealing with the Holocaust (Schindler’s List, The Pianist).  The Captain manages to stray from the path of ‘the familiar,’ holding only on Herold and the German men he encounters. The only traces we get of any ‘foreigners’ to this world, are in the form of several (enemy) planes flying overhead.

While the film is based on actual events, Schwentke makes a bold move, by not giving his subject an elaborate backstory. At first, one can see that Herold’s wearing of the uniform gives him easy access to hot meals and warm beds. However, as he gathers more men, his actions become more enigmatic. This open interpretation allows the audience to draw their own conclusions to a number of the snap decisions he makes, and will probably make for some interesting discussions after the film ends.

When it comes to the enigmatic Herold, Max Hubacher does a decent job in his characterization of the historical figure. One can at times see his fear of being found out, and at other times, he creates a steely gaze that makes one question just what is going on behind those eyes.

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L to R: Freytag (Milan Peschel), Willi Herold (Max Hubacher), Kipinski (Frederick Lau)

Of the men that Herold commands, two that stand out are Freytag (Milan Peschel), and Kipinski (Frederick Lau). Freytag is Herold’s most loyal soldier, but also one of his more restrained confidantes. In contrast, Kipinski seems to revel in any chance to cause trouble, oftentimes becoming the loose cannon in the group. In several instances, it is how these men react to Herold’s commands, that adds some extra tension to some of the film’s more haunting scenes.

The Captain is also an intriguing look at how easily some people will compromise their morality. This is best shown when Herold begins giving orders to deal with the deserters at the camp he and his men arrive at. One can see the camp’s officers growing upset at their command being usurped, but given Herold’s uniform and proclamation that he is in the good graces of Der Fuehrer, many of them are quick to go along with his orders.

Where the film falters a little for me, is in the rather loose, pseudo-documentary style that Schwentke chooses to use. Some scenes seem to drag on a little too long, and there are a few instances that feel like someone may have spliced in film from another reel altogether.

There also is the use of a synthesized score in places, intermingled with traditional German music. Several of the synthesized pieces seem like odd choices given some of the scenes they are used in, though for much of the film, it is the general ambiance of the bleak scenes and music of the era that pull us into the film’s world.

Overall, it is rare to find a film about Germany that does what The Captain does. While Robert Schwentke’s historically-based film may have it’s flaws, the thought-provoking look at perceptions and power that it gives us, makes it an intriguing film to experience.

Final Grade: B

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Movie Review: Jurassic World – Fallen Kingdom

(Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of science-fiction violence and peril)

25 years ago, Steven Spielberg ruled the summer box-office with Jurassic Park. The film not only wowed audiences around the world, but also signaled full-speed-ahead for the use of computer technology in feature films.

Since then, the film series has had two mediocre sequels, a nostalgic ‘reboot,’ and now, with Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, an attempt to shake things up in a big way.

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Three years after the events in Jurassic World, the island’s long-dormant volcano, is about to erupt.

While debates rage about trying to save the dinosaurs, Claire Dearing (Bryce Dallas Howard) and Owen Grady (Chris Pratt), are recruited as part of a secret operation to try and rescue as many of the dinos as possible. This order comes from John Hammond’s former partner Benjamin Lockwood (James Cromwell), and his assistant, Eli Mills (Rafe Spall).

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The rescue party encounters a Brachiosaurus.

While Claire and Owen are to assist with helping collect a number of dinosaur species, key among them is Blue, one of the velociraptors that Owen trained, and who exhibited some remarkable intelligence.

However, as the clock ticks down to the destruction of the island, things start to quickly spiral out of control.

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Much like how The Last Jedi looked to change the game with Star WarsFallen Kingdom is looking to rock some people out of their comfort zone as well.

Jurassic World’s Colin Trevorrow vacates the director’s chair (but has co-written the script along with Derek Connolly), and passes the torch onto director J.A. Bayona (The Orphanage, A Monster Calls).

The character depictions manage to be ‘passable’ for the most part. Pratt seems to have dialed up the ‘smugness’ in his depiction of Owen, and in the three years since the first film, Claire has gone from ‘proper businesswoman’ to a ‘dinosaur rights activist’ (shades of John Hammond in The Lost World?).

The two are joined by two conservationists that Claire knows, in the form of a no-nonsense paleo-vet named Zia (played by Daniella Pineda), and a tech-whiz by the name of Franklin (Justice Smith). Franklin ends up being the comic relief for much of the film, though his ‘city-boy-out-in-the-jungle’ act may grate on some who’ve seen it in a number of other films.

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Maisie Lockwood (Isabella Sermon)

Like all Jurassic films, this one attempts to shoehorn in a child, in the form of Bruce Lockwood’s granddaughter, Maisie (Isabella Sermon). The film tries to add an air of mystery surrounding her, though I think if you pay attention to several scenes, you might be a few steps ahead regarding what the resolution is.

Watching the film, you may be surprised how quickly the story moves through the island of Isla Nublar, almost like Bayona is excitedly wanting to get us to ‘the good stuff.’

Unfortunately, much of the film quickly starts to feel like it’s a little too overloaded with subplots. It wants to not only add more to Hammond’s backstory, but also try adding more to Owen and Blue’s history, let alone dabble a bit more with the ‘genetic tampering’ we were privy to in Jurassic World. Plus, don’t be surprised if you get some Lost World vibes from the film, regarding it’s sub-plot about mankind trying to once again control nature…and once again getting lectured on this topic by Dr Ian Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum in a very brief appearance).

By this point, the awe of seeing a dinosaur has worn off, and Bayona tries (commendably) to give us a few notable moments, but none of them come close to those ingrained in our minds from the 1993 film. Where he does succeed, is in elevating the tension with several darkened scenes. After awhile, the audience may find themselves keeping track of the flashes of light in some scenes. This is usually the key for something to sneak closer to us, depending on the number of light flashes.

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Director J.A. Bayona, inspecting one of his actors.

Speaking of ‘flashes,’ that seems to be what may stand out the most regarding the film. There are little ‘flashes’ of memorable moments that will probably stick with the viewer, but in regards to embracing the film as a whole, it feels like that may be a tall order to fill.

Even so, I couldn’t help but sense that Bayona’s fandom of Steven Spielberg, is inscribed all over Fallen Kingdom. I noted not only a number of scenes feeling “Spielbergian” regarding their use of lighting and reflections, but also a number of touchstones related to the 1993 film (and possibly it’s sequels from 1997 and 2001?).

In the end, Fallen Kingdom attempts to steer us in a new direction regarding a world in which dinosaurs and man exist…one that may surely divide fans of the Jurassic franchise, on just which direction the series should head towards.

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Final Grade: B- (Final Thoughts: Following in the foosteps of Colin Trevorrow, director J.A. Bayona attempts to steer Fallen Kingdom in a new direction. The film’s attempts to shake up what we’ve come to expect, ends up getting a bit unwieldly, as it strives to balance a number of subplots over the course of it’s 2-hour run-time. The attempts to awe the audience, pale in comparison to a number of moments where the director manages to build tension with some well-paced scenes, relying a bit on the ‘Spielberg playbook.’ )

 

Movie Review: Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Rated PG-13 for some thematic elements and language

When it comes to the world of children’s television programming, probably noone handled it in such a unique way, as Fred Rogers.

Originally intent on becoming a priest, his career path swung in an unlikely direction, when he first saw what was being offered as children’s programming in the early 1950’s. Pies in the face and shows that seemed to care more about selling children products, made Fred want to use the medium in a way to help children.

MrRogers-1This led him to start what became known as a staple of The Public Broadcasting System (aka PBS), for almost thirty-five years. Mr Roger’s Neighborhood was a show where Fred could talk to children in a simple environment, have them experience new things, and send them to the Land of Make-Believe via his toy trolley car. On his show, he embodied the figure of a good neighbor, the kind that would not judge, but want to talk to you, and get to know more about who you were.

With his latest film, director Morgan Neville gives us more information on a man whom many of us have only known from our youthful watchings.

Rather than choose to have a narrator guide us through the film, Fred’s life is chronicled through remembrances with family, friends, and acquaintances. It is through their observations and memories, that the film is buoyed onward with Rogers’ ‘spirit.’ For those expecting there to be a lot of ‘dirt’ to dish out, you will be disappointed. Pretty much the kind of man you saw on your television screen, was very much what Mr Rogers was like off-camera.

My memories of Rogers’ show were very faint, and what the film revealed were things I had never realized. Notable was how Fred would take real-world problems, and try to deal with them in the settings of his show. Covering topics like assassination and even divorce, he would try to help children (and in some cases adults), make sense out of things.

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Daniel Striped Tiger, with Fred Rogers

Of course, he wasn’t without his own problems. From being ill as a child to being a chubby kid in his early teens, he seemed to hold onto these memories, and try to channel them into something that could help others. Some of the things he experienced, are presented to us in animated form, with the puppet of Daniel the Striped Tiger from the Land of Make Believe, standing in for Fred. In fact, some claim that Daniel was a stand-in on the show, for how Fred felt about certain things.

On his show, he seemed to want to show us a world where kids could depend on grown-ups to help them, and to give them the attention and love they needed. In the times we are in now, such things feel like a ‘myth’ from long ago. Watching Fred talk strongly about his beliefs in how love and acceptance are keys to helping those in the world, will definitely make many people wish Mr Rogers was still with us today. One could imagine him sitting down by his staircase, and trying to help relieve people of the numerous fears that have taken hold of our daily lives…and those knowing that the words coming out of this man’s mouth, were genuine, heartfelt, and honest.

Released amid a cacophony of summer films, Won’t You Be My Neighbor feels like the ‘pleasant’ alternative that not only entertains, but also educates. I do agree with one headline, that it is definitely ‘the film we need right now.’

I think for many, it will act as a ‘salve for the soul.’ This is a film that will surely make some sad to realize how long we have been without Mr Rogers, but maybe, learn a few new things about him, and take away some new lessons to apply to our world, once the lights come up in the theater.

“Love is at the root of everything. All learning, all parenting, all relationships. Love, or the lack of it” – Fred Rogers

Final Grade: A-

Movie Review: Pacific Rim – Uprising

For filmmaker Guillermo Del Toro, the movies he makes have often been about bringing to life something that he feels passionately about. In the case of his 2013 release of Pacific Rim, the result was an emotional mixture of Japanese monster fights, interpersonal connections, and Mexican wrestling.

The film wasn’t a big hit stateside, but racked up three times it’s domestic gross overseas. Five years after it’s release, Steven S DeKnight expands on Del Toro’s world, with Pacific Rim: Uprising.

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Over 10 years have passed since the events in the first film.  In that time, the Jaeger program has been reborn, and newer, younger recruits are being trained for the possibility of another invasion from beyond our dimension.

One person who finds himself being brought back into the program, is Jake Pentecost (John Boyega). Jake has lived his life outside the shadow of his famous father Stacker Pentecost (Idris Elba), but is coaxed back into service by his sister, Mako Mori (Rinko Kikuchi).

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Jake Pentecost (John Boyega)

The human-manned Jaeger program also finds itself in jeopardy, when a Chinese consortium led by Liwen Shao (Tian Jing), wants to streamline the program, and control the huge machines by way of unmanned drones, thanks to the help of former Shatterdome scientist, Dr Newton Geisler (Charlie Day).

However, things suddenly change when an unknown Jaeger appears, setting off a chain of events concerning Jake, and those around him.

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Right from the start, it’s clear to see that Uprising is one of those sequels where most of the first film’s main cast, are either gone (just what happened to Jaeger pilot Raleigh Beckett is unknown), or relegated to supporting roles. Much like Roland Emmerich’s Independence Day sequel, this film wants us to focus on ‘a new generation’ of young characters.

Jake Pentecost quickly becomes our film’s Raleigh Beckett. Jake is played up as the rebellious child of a heroic figure, but fortunately, Boyega manages to do a decent job balancing out his character, as well as giving him several humorous moments.

While Del Toro’s 2013 film seemed intent on dealing with the emotions of his characters, Uprising either speeds through some of these areas, or doesn’t do quite enough. Case-in-point, is where we are introduced to the young Jaeger pilots. I was hoping we’d really get to see them come together through training, but much of this is glossed over in favor of focusing more on the Chinese Jaeger-drones subplot.

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Amara Namani (Cailee Spaeny)

Out of all the young pilots on-screen, the one whom the film puts most of it’s emphasis on, is the orphaned Amara Namani (Cailee Spaeny). Given her attitude towards Jake and her mechanical prowess, I couldn’t help but feel like I was seeing a fleshed out version, of what Michael Bay intended for the character of Izabella in Transformers: The Last Knight to be (at least I could believe that Amara was mechanically-inclined!). However, while Amara can be a bit stand-offish, the film does make her more than just ‘a girl with attitude.’ She wants to make a difference, but fortunately, she isn’t going to just stand in front of a multi-storey Kaiju and tell it to ‘go to hell.’

For those who felt the first film was lacking in giant robot/creature battles, Uprising will definitely be seen as a marked improvement. However, some of the effects work feels like they had to pick-and-choose where the production money went (no elaborate ILM-budgeted night battles in the rain this time!). I’m sure some will feel that the new Jaegers are more in line with Michael Bay’s Transformers, but much like computers getting smaller over time, to me it makes sense that 10 years beyond the first film, the Jaeger designs would look a little leaner and more agile, rather than the bulkier, heavier first-generation models.

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It’s fair to say that director Steven DeKnight does his own thing with the material, and while it doesn’t hit as deeply on an emotional level, I was surprised to find that Uprising felt like it could have been adapted from an anime or manga series. There are certainly some small touchstones to the first film, though I couldn’t help but feel like some bits of the story, felt like it was cobbled together from some recent science fiction films I’d seen in the last few years. However, unlike those films such as Independence Day: Resurgence and Transformers: Age of Extinction (that just seemed to plod on with a few punctuated scenes that held my interest for a few minutes), Uprising managed to press my buttons, and actually had me entranced throughout!

Seeing the film in IMAX (though not released in 3D) I thought would be quite entertaining. Unfortunately, it felt like the camerawork at times got a little too close to the action. Though it is impressive to see the images projected so large, it feels like an average-sized screen would be more-than-welcome for viewing purposes (plus, there weren’t any floor-to-ceiling IMAX-style shots to make it that worthwhile).

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Final Grade: B (Final Thoughts: “Pacific Rim: Uprising” continues on in the world Guillermo Del Toro created, but feels ‘manageable’ for a second film. Writer/Director Steve DeKnight chooses to almost flip the first film on it’s head, choosing to make the giant robot/monster battles our main focus, while jettisoning some important time to allow the audience to really get to know much of the film’s cast.

 

Movie Review: A Wrinkle in Time

(Rated PG for thematic elements and some peril)

The last time I recall reading Madeline L’engle’s book A Wrinkle In Time, was during the summer of 2003, when I decided to spend my summer reading banned books.

While I wasn’t wholly in love with the book, most of it’s concepts still stuck in my head (warping space and time is often a good way to get my attention).

When word came that Jennifer Lee (the writer of Disney’s Frozen) was attached to write an adaptation, I was actually excited to see what she could do with the material. And then, when word came that Ava DuVernay (the director of Selma) was attached, I felt this might definitely be something special, coming from the House of Mouse.

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It’s been four years since the patriarch of the Murry family (played by Chris Pine) suddenly disappeared. In that time, Mrs Murry (played by Gugu Mbatha-Raw) has tried to care for their two children, Meg (Storm Reid), and Charles Wallace (Deric McCabe).

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L to R: Mrs Who (Mindy Kaling), Mrs Which (Oprah Winfreey), Mrs Whatsit (Reese Witherspoon)

While Charles Wallace is an intelligent young prodigy, Meg has not coped well with the disappearance of her father. One day, she is surprised when Charles Wallace introduces her to three strange women, who may know where her father is.

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As the film started out, I was very surprised at the pacing DuVernay was moving at (we don’t have any super-long backstories, and we don’t have Meg brooding around for half the film). This is definitely a film that trusts that it’s audience is smart enough to assemble the pieces, and just keep on moving!

While advertising has played up the roles of Mrs Which (Oprah Winfrey), Mrs Whatsit (Reese Witherspoon), and Mrs Who (Mindy Kaling), they are most definitely here to just fill supporting roles (like Johnny Depp in Alice in Wonderland), along with providing a little humor (courtesy of Who and Whatsit). While some may be disappointed about not getting a huge dose of Oprah, I felt it was nice that the script didn’t try to make the three wear out their welcome.

For much of the film, the secret weapon that the marketing seems to hide, is Storm Reid as Meg Murry.

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Meg Murry (Storm Reid)

Reid’s characterization manages to feel ‘real,’ and even when she’s spouting a few lines that should sound corny, she never seems to falter. This is Meg’s journey, and we can definitely see a change come over her, as the story goes along (plus, I did enjoy that Reid sports glasses throughout the entire film, just like Meg in the book!).

I had vague memories of Charles Wallace being a child prodigy from reading the book, and Deric McCabe managed to portray the character quite well. With know-it-all children, there is a certain propensity for them to get really obnoxious on film, but McCabe never manages to get there.

Overall, the film’s cast seems to be it’s greatest strength. Even the minor players like Levi Miller and Zach Galifianakis, work remarkably well with their limited roles.

The trailers have definitely played up a lot of fantasy visuals, but don’t expect this to turn into The Chronicles of Narnia. While most of the scenes manage to do a good job showing us places beyond our Earth, the film feels like it meanders a bit too long in a picturesque green landscape, that feels like Lord of the Rings mixed with the painterly visuals from What Dreams May Come.

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L to R: Mrs Who (Mindy Kaling), Calvin (Levi Miller), Meg (Storm Reid), Charles Wallace (Deric McCabe), Mrs Whatsit (Reese Witherspoon)

There are also a few areas that seem to almost have a very abrupt change-of-pace. One notable scene felt like it was building to something bigger, when it just suddenly fizzled out to a rather ho-hum resolution.

A few times, I was surprised when non-orchestral score music was used across several scenes, somewhat ruining the mood for me. While this may have been done to play to the younger audience, I couldn’t help but wonder what composer Ramin Djawadi could have done with the few scenes I saw.

At times, I was reminded of the tone of films like Bridge to Terabithia and the recent remake of Pete’s Dragon. There’s a sense of trying to make a family film that is a bit ‘smarter’ than most of the other stuff out there, and one that almost goes back to the ‘darker’ tone of films from the 1980’s (such as The Neverending Story, and Labyrinth).

A Wrinkle in Time does have it’s faults, but I was very surprised that even so, it’s heart was in the right place. DuVernay’s film managed to hit me emotionally in several places…something that I felt was severely lacking from the last Wrinkle in Time adaptation I saw, which was made by Disney’s Television division back in 2004.

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Final Grade: B (Final Thoughts: Ava DuVernay’s adaptation of “A Wrinkle In Time” brings us a PG-rated fantasy film, that carries along at a good clip, thanks to the talents of it’s cast and crew. The pacing of the story can feel a little uneven in places, but even with a run-time of almost two hours, it never feels boring. )