Book Review: The Art and Making of Pacific Rim – Uprising

In 2013, filmmaker Guillermo Del Toro released Pacific Rim, his ode to Japanese monster-movies. Five years later, director Steven S DeKnight would continue the film’s story, with Pacific Rim: Uprising.

Taking place ten years after the first film, Uprising showed us a world that has been altered in many ways by the former Kaiju invasions. The once-in-jeopardy Jaeger program has been reborn, upgraded to newer models, and standing by in case of another possible invasion.

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Concept art showing Pacific Rim: Uprising’s new fleet of Jaegers. From L to R: Titan Redeemer, Guardian Bravo, Gipsy Avenger, and Sabre Athena.

However, there is also a threat from the corporate world, as China’s Shao Industries, looks to streamline (and possibly privatize) the Jaeger program.

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Over the years, the publisher Insight Editions has handled a number of behind-the-scenes books for Del Toro’s films, and they have continued to provide their services with this book as well.

These days, there are often a lot of things going on in some films, that it’s on-screen characters don’t have time to explain or point out. This has led to publication/tie-ins in the form of prequel comic books or accompanying publications, which to someone like me, can be seen as a bit much (most of the time, I just want to walk in and see the film). However, I am often moreso intrigued about the development and design process, that brings to life the images on-screen.

With this book, author Daniel Wallace manages to not only shed some light on the development process of the film, but provide plenty of additional pieces of information from those who worked on the film as well. We get everything from actors telling about their audition process, to the sound effects crew talking about how they came up with specific audio experiences you will now think twice about.

Reading books like these, I’m often surprised how I come away finding out information about the design process, that I didn’t consider. A good example is that the coloration of the numerous Jaeger models we see, are tied into certain protective units or branches in our society.

A good example is a Jaeger named November Ayjax, whose duty is to patrol along the war-ravaged Los Angeles Coastline. The coloration of the Jaeger is blue, tying into the theme of it being like a Police Officer for the area, “keeping the peace.”

I was also pleased at the over-abundance of different concept and design examples throughout. A prime example is in the design of Gipsy Avenger’s head. There are quite a number of iterations, and it feels like what we see in the book, are only a fraction of them. That ability for the book to provide a great number of visual concepts, made me eager to keep turning pages, let alone going back to review them once I had finished it.

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Some of the many iterations of Gipsy Avenger’s head design.

One concept that Insight Editions has used in a number of their books, is the inclusion of a number of removable, extra materials in their books.

For this book, they include everything from a collection of storyboard images, to Newton Geiszler’s (aka Charlie Day) Kaiju tattoo designs. While these are nice little additions to the overall book, I have felt that the company’s inclusion of these items affixed to the various pages gives them a greater chance of being lost. Personally, I feel they could have been included in a large envelope at the end of the book (maybe with a rubber-stamped “Classified Shatterdome Information” title across the front of the envelope!).

What I was most surprised about, was that while the book does give us insight into parts of the film, they also held back on revealing some major plot-points. I’ve often been apprehensive of some making-of books ruining everything about a film, but this one has just enough information to keep the overall story, a mystery. For the record, there are some images that do tie into some of the plot-twists, but they are never called out for the reader.

Earlier this year, I was eager to get my hands on another Insight Editions tome: The Art of Ready Player One. However, while that book gave me plenty of information, I felt it didn’t answer as many of the questions I had regarding it’s visual design/development phase. In contrast, The Art and Making of Pacific Rim: Uprising ended up feeling like a much more satisfying read. For those that enjoyed Pacific Rim: Uprising, this is definitely a fitting companion book, and one of the more well-compiled reads I’ve encountered in awhile that connects to a feature-length film.

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About MWH1980

Growing up in the state of Iowa, one would assume I'd be enamored with pigs and corn. Well, I wasn't. Instead, I grew fascinated by many things that were entertainment-related. Things like movies, animation, toys, books, and many more kept my attention. This blog I hope to use to express myself regarding my varied obsessions. (P.S. There's no Photoshop involved in that Gravatar-I really am holding an Oscar)

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