Movie Review: Summer of 84

(This film is Not Rated)

Once upon a time, the suburban landscape was seen as the next safe bastion of modern society, beyond the seediness and crime of the city.

Soon, it seemed that the well-manicured lawns and the gable-roofed dwellings, were little more than false-fronts to unspeakable terror.

In the 80’s, there were a number of films that explored what might be hiding behind the locked doors, with films like Fright Night and The Burbs showing normality being invaded by the abnormal.

In Summer of 84, the directing trio behind the cult-favorite film Turbo Kid, move their 80’s-era focus out of the action genre, and into the territory of suspense.

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In Ipswitch, Oregon, 15-year-old Davey Armstrong (Graham Verchere), is spending his summer vacation delivering newspapers, hanging out with his best friends, and lusting after the neighborhood hottie, Nikki (played by Tiera Skovebye). However, the lazy summer mood is soon broken, when word comes that a serial killer is on the loose, and a number of boys in the area begin to turn up missing.

A fan of mysteries and unexplained events, Davey soon believes he has the perfect suspect: his next-door-neighbor, Wayne Mackey (Rich Sommer). This seems strange to his friends, as Mackey is a local Police Officer that has lived in their neighborhood for years, but Davey is determined to solve this summer mystery, with or without them.

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When it comes to retro-laced media, we seem to be living in an era that is currently set on idolizing the world of 30 years ago. In the last few years, we’ve seen shows like Stranger Things and film adaptations like It, plunge their youthful protagonists into a familiar-yet-frightful world.

Unlike those recent pop-culture hits, Summer of 84 has no supernatural elements to be found, or multiple plot layers to pick through. The story strives for something a bit simpler in it’s execution, with much of the time focused on the main kids.

Summer84-1

L to R: Dale Woodworth (Caleb Emery), Davey Armstrong (Graham Verchere), Curtis Farraday (Cory Gruter-Andrew), Tommy Eaton (Judah Lewis)

Along for the ride with Davey, are Dale Woodworth (Caleb Emery), Tommy Eaton (Judah Lewis), and Curtis Farraday (Cory Gruter-Andrew). While the film starts out feeling like it’s just going to be these four talking trash to each other and oogling skin-mags for a majority of time, it surprisingly manages to open up a bit more, and reveal a bit more about who a few of them really are.

I was also surprised to find that there were also a fair amount of jump-scares that actually end up working in the film’s favor (with some of them getting quite creative). The filmmakers definitely use an impressive sleight-of-hand trick to make them work.

While the strange, outlandish wasteland of Turbo Kid seemed open for unquestioning acceptance of that story’s world, there are quite a number of areas in Summer of 84 that had me questioning some of the film’s logic that the directors use.

A good example would be that while we see headlines about a number of young boys disappearing in the Ipswitch area, we never get any indication that the parents or local authorities are that concerned for their kids. Several times we see the four boys and some other non-descript neighbor kids playing a game at night, and yet there’s never a call for a curfew.

There also are some uneven bumps in the road regarding Davey’s crush (and former babysitter), Nikki. Originally seen as an object of desire, the film soon throws her in as an unofficial member of the boy’s investigative group (kind of like how Andy and Steff became unofficial Goonies), but some of the ways the story has her pop up in certain areas seems a bit odd. It almost feels like some added backstory on Nikki could have made her character a bit more acceptable in some scenarios.

Much of the film’s tone almost seems to meander along, until it gets to it’s third act. It is here that it felt like the audience I was with, was suddenly jolted awake by what we were seeing. The suckerpunch end scenes of the film are definitely something that is still seared into my brain, but I did wish that the film could have given us a few more moments during the story, that made us sit-up and take notice a bit more.

Summer of 84 is commendable for not throwing in a supernatural element to it’s nostalgic tale, but there are areas where the storytelling gets a bit too loose for my tastes. A good film, but it feels like with some extra time and care, it could have been a great one.

Final Grade: B-

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About MWH1980

Growing up in the state of Iowa, one would assume I'd be enamored with pigs and corn. Well, I wasn't. Instead, I grew fascinated by many things that were entertainment-related. Things like movies, animation, toys, books, and many more kept my attention. This blog I hope to use to express myself regarding my varied obsessions. (P.S. There's no Photoshop involved in that Gravatar-I really am holding an Oscar)

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